Living Life Forwards Gallery

Living Life Forwards – Gallery

From Fiji to New Zealand, Hawaii and the US mainland …

Fijian mountains.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Central South Island, New Zealand.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Big Island Coast, Hawaii, USA.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Fiji

Fiji

Fiji is a remote island in the South Pacific with roughly 850,000 residents. Traditionally, the country has relied on high cost, imported diesel for power generation. However, the FEA, which was established in 1966 under the Electricity Act, recently revised its mission to ‘provide 90% of the country’s energy from renewable energy sources’. A wealth of new policies and projects have since been implemented or proposed (including Nadarivatu and Qaliwana) to help the country achieve this goal and more adequately address the electricity needs of its growing population (READ MORE).
The Nadarivatu Dam, also known as the Korolevu Dam, is a concrete gravity dam on the upper reaches of the Sigatoka River in Nadarivatu District of Nadroga-Navosa Province, Fiji. The primary purpose of the dam is to generate hydroelectric power in the 42MW Nadarivatu Hydropower Station.
The Nadarivatu project consists of a 42 MW power station encompassing two vertical pelton turbines providing 103GWh of electricity annually. The project is comprised of:

  • A 30-meter-high concrete gravity dam, including three radial gates and two sluice gates;
  • Two kilometers of tunnels, including intake structures and screens;
  • Two kilometers of tunnels, including intake structures and screens;
  • A 1.5-kilometer-long, 2-meter-diameter buried steel penstock pipeline;
  • A 132 kV, 5-kilometer-long transmission line connecting to the existing Fiji transmission system through a switching station.

(READ MORE)

Dancers at the Nadarivatu Hydropower, Suva, Fiji.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

The Nadarivatu Dam, Suva, Fiji.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Nadarivatu Dam – Interior, Suva, Fiji.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

New Zealand

New Zealand

Around 40% of New Zealand’s primary energy is supplied by renewable energy sources. In the future people will have access to significant additional renewable energy resources including geothermal heat, biomass and sources of renewable electricity generation (READ MORE).

HYDROELECTRICITY

Hydroelectricity has been the backbone of New Zealand’s electricity supply system from the start, and hydroelectric dams are a well-known feature of the New Zealand landscape. New Zealand generates more than 50% of its electricity from hydro generation, much of it through large hydro dams such as Benmore, Manapouri, and Clyde (READ MORE).

GEOTHERMAL

New Zealand has an abundant supply of geothermal resources both on the North and South Island with high temperature resources primarily centered on the Taupo Volcanic Zone and Ngawha in Northland. New Zealand has an abundant supply of geothermal resources both on the North and South Island with high temperature resources primarily centered on the Taupo Volcanic Zone and Ngawha in Northland. Geothermal energy is currently New Zealand second-most used fuel for renewable electricity generation, after hydro, supplying over 14% of our electricity in 2012 (READ MORE).

WIND ENERGY


New Zealand has 19 wind farms either operating or under construction. These wind farms currently have a combined installed capacity of 623 megawatts. They supply about 5% of New Zealand’s annual electricity generation, which is about the same amount of electricity as 180,000 kiwi homes use in a year.
There is currently 2,500 MW of wind generation consented in New Zealand and developers are exploring sites throughout New Zealand for new wind farms (READ MORE).

BIOENERGY


The contribution of bioenergy to New Zealand’s total energy supply is difficult to estimate due to no accurate numbers being available for the use of wood for residential heating. Even taking this into account, bioenergy, mainly in the form of biogas and woody biomass, is responsible for roughly 8% of primary energy supply (READ MORE).

Maori House Carvings, New Zealand.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Champagna Lake at Wai-O-Tapu, Rotorua, New Zealand. The name Champagne Lake is derived from the abundant efflux of carbon dioxide, similar to a glass of bubbling champagne.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Benmore, Hydro station, North Otago, New Zealand. Benmore has six 90 MW generating units, and a generation output of up to 540 MW. It generates enough electricity each year for about 298,000 average New Zealand homes. (READ MORE).

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Te Uku is a 28-turbine wind farm located in Waikato, New Zealand, generating enough electricity each year for about 30,000 average New Zealand homes (READ MORE).

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Wairakei Power Station is a geothermal power station near the Wairakei Geothermal Field in New Zealand. The Wairakei A and B stations have 10 steam turbines ranging in size from 4–30 megawatts (MW). The station generates on average 157MW.

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

The West Wind is a 62-turbine wind farm located in Makara, west of Wellington city, New Zealand, generating enough electricity each year for about 62,000 average New Zealand homes (READ MORE).

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Hawaii

Hawaii

The State of Hawai‘i is made up of several islands located in the middle of the North Pacific Ocean. There are eight main islands, of which only seven are inhabited. In 2010, petroleum provided 86% of the total energy consumed in the state and is mainly consumed for transportation and electricity generation. In 2010, 56.2% of the oil was used for transportation. The fact that 32.8% was used for electricity generation implied that the average electricity retail price and bills paid in the islands were very high in comparison with the average U.S. ones. This is still valid today: in 2011, the retail electricity prices in Hawai’i have been, in average, three-time higher than the average U.S. ones for the residential, commercial, and industrial sector. Remarkably, the electricity retail prices differ considerably depending on the island. This is due to the lack of interisland grid connections and the autonomy each island has with respect to electric power generation.
Even if the islands have no local fossil fuel resources, they have abundant natural resources such as wind, solar, geothermal, biofuels, and hydropower. These precious resources could potentially meet a substantial portion of Hawaii’s energy needs.

Search Renewable Energy Projects: READ MORE.

Hawaii First Wind Farm, Oahu, Hawaii (USA)

(Photo courtesy of Royer Studios)

Solar panels, Hawaii (USA)

(Photo courtesy of RevoluSun)

Solar panels, Hawaii (USA).

(Photo courtesy of RevoluSun)

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